5 Key Principles for Working with the Poor: #1 Listen First

When your church helps the poor, could your actions be summarized: “See a problem; fix a problem?” Many churches work to repair what’s fractured in the lives of the poor or try to solve their problems for them, but they forget that poverty is about people and ministry is relational.

1. Listen First

Often we act on behalf of the poor without actually knowing them, or even asking them about their situation.

Shortly after college, I began going on short-term trips with my church to a rural part of Central America.  Many of the kids had tattered clothes, rotting teeth, and gnats circling them as soon as they stopped moving. We quickly grew to love these kids and wanted to do what we could to help.

Giving hygiene kits to these kids in Central America failed to solve the hygiene problems in their community.
Giving hygiene kits to these kids in Central America failed to solve the hygiene problems in their community.

We had seen this problem and we decided to do what we could to fix it. So, throughout the year we started collecting travel-size hygiene items at hotels. The next year we returned with enough large Ziploc bags for each family in the community to have items like soaps, shampoos, tooth brushes, and toothpaste.

We walked through town passing these out door to door. We felt good doing this, but we never actually asked the community if they wanted hygiene kits or felt like they had a need for them.

Over the next five years I went back on the same trip and passed out hygiene kits every year without seeing any change in personal hygiene in the community. We were unable to fix the problem. But I worry more about how we affected problems that can’t be seen. Without listening first to the community about things they could change, our actions carried a clear message: You look dirty. Here’s something to fix that.

Years later, I read about a study done by the World Bank in which they asked 60,000 poor people from around the world about poverty. I expected to read quotes from the poor talking about hunger, lack of clean water, the need for adequate shelter, and poor hygiene. But instead, the poor spoke more often of issues that are unseen, things like dignity, hopelessness, oppression, humiliation, and isolation.

It helped me realize that poverty is not only more complex than I thought, but it goes much deeper than what I can see on the surface.

 

Published by

Mark Lamb

Mark Lamb

Mark Lamb is a lifelong student of ministry with the poor. He combines his experience working at World Concern bringing churches and international communities together with his education at Dallas Theological Seminary to help churches grow in their ministry with the poor.

3 thoughts on “5 Key Principles for Working with the Poor: #1 Listen First”

  1. Great insights, Mark! I’ve been working with the poor throughout the world; as well as here in the states most of my life, and I agree wholeheartedly with your comments. We are a people who have great intentions with our “rescue” mentality, but sometimes we fail to take time to be relational; to have a conversation (it can be done even with a language barrier), to listen, to be involved with more than just a hand-out. This takes a time investment on our part. When that type of investment is made, change not only comes to those we help, but also to us…which just might be the real change that God intends!

    Thanks for your investment!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *