Resilience For Life: Ages 0-100+

When Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans in the United States in 2005, three-quarters of the people it killed were over 60.  This is unfortunately not an isolated incident.  Often, older people are the ones most affected by a disaster event.

Today, on the International Day for Disaster Reduction, the international community is coming together to recognize the critical role older people play in building more resilient communities by sharing their experience and knowledge.

At World Concern, we’re joining in this call to include older people in planning and preparedness activities while recognizing the value they bring to their families and communities.

We’re currently working with older people and their communities in eight countries to help reduce risk and save lives.  What does this look like?

Building more secure homes to protect families.

Shelter beneficiary Rozario
Photo credit: Medair
women with house
Photo credit: Medair

Improving sanitation through the construction of latrines to prevent the spread of water borne disease.

man with latrine1

Teaching communities about soil retention and reforestation to protect the land.

man in field1

Developing early warning systems and evacuation plans that include people of all ages.

wc sign in bangladesh

women in bangladesh

Strengthening infrastructure like flood water canals to keep water away from homes and people safe.

 

canal1

mother and daughter1

“The older person is often invisible in our communities until they show up in the mortality figures after a disaster event,” said head of the United Nations Disaster Reduction Office, Margareta Wahlström.

By working together towards the common goal of focusing on inclusiveness of people of all ages in disaster preparedness, we can ensure that no one is invisible and that everyone becomes resilient for life!

 

Published by

Austin Snowbarger

Austin Snowbarger

Austin is serving as a communications liaison in Haiti. He and his wife Martha share stories, photos, and videos of World Concern’s work in Haiti here and on their blog, Echoes of Hope.

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