Solar Audio Bibles Bring God’s Word to the Unreached

Sharing the gospel is difficult among the Morans – young men in Northern Kenya who live outside their villages in order to guard them. But when they were given solar audio Bibles, they were happy to listen to them.

man with a solar audio Bible
Lpenesi never heard the Word of God or anything about Jesus until the Moran’s sports evangelism event when he gave his life to Christ.

A unique and powerful way to share about the Lord is through solar-powered audio Bibles. These allow people to hear the Word of God in their own language, regardless of their ability to read. A solar audio Bible brings God’s Word to people in the poorest, most remote places in the world, like the Samburu region where the Morans live.

Recently, the Morans came to a day of competitions, games, and delicious food. When the sun went down, ninety young men watched “The Jesus Film.” And many prayed to accept Christ as their personal Savior. They each received an audio Bible.

man listening to a solar audio Bible
Letitiya loves listening to the audio Bible while herding livestock.
man with closed eyes listening to a solar audio Bible
Toima says the contents of the audio Bible are good for the heart. He plans to share the Bible with his family when he gets married.

Imagine the life-changing impact the gospel has for a Moran. A personal relationship with the Lord changes everything for them. Suddenly they have something to rely on that is greater than themselves. There is someone with them when they’re all alone. And they have an eternity with Jesus to look forward to. The truth sets them free and fills them with joy. You can see it on their faces!

Audio Bibles are one of the many life-changing gifts in the Global Gift Guide! Click here to give one and change a life today.

Is fear gripping you? Remember these words …

“But God” … two words that even COVID-19 can’t defy.

When news headlines get worse by the hour. When it feels like an invisible enemy is stalking us. When we are forced to live in isolation. That’s when the words “But God” can break the grip of fear and set us free to look up and see the One who fights our battles for us.

Whenever people in the Bible faced impossible situations, they were reminded that nothing is impossible with God. One of those times was in 2 Chronicles 20 when Jerusalem was besieged by enemies and King Jehoshaphat cried out to God for deliverance. God answered through his prophet and said, “Do not be afraid nor dismayed because of this great multitude, for the battle is not yours, but God’s.

The battle we face now is a threatening virus that makes us afraid. And it’s okay to be afraid. Nobody wants to get sick, or worse. It’s normal to protect ourselves and those we love. God knows how we feel.

That’s why World Concern is taking precautionary measures to stay healthy, keep COVID-19 from spreading, and protect the most vulnerable among us.

It’s what we’ve always done in the remote places where we work. In the same way that we train villagers in the prevention of malaria, parasites, and water-borne diseases, we are training them in ways to prevent COVID-19. We take this threat very seriously. And we are doing everything we can to strengthen the health of these precious communities.

We care about your health, too. We are praying for you! Please continue to pray for us and those we serve.

 

When Food is the Miracle You Need

Will you provide a miracle today?

You can’t travel to Fatimah’s (*her name has been changed for security reasons) country, but your prayers and your gifts can change her life.

That’s a miracle. And you can bet that Fatimah needs a miracle right now.

Fatimah’s husband died because of a war that she and her four children still live in. Her city is in rubble, and her family in constant danger. It has gone on for so long that she’s never quite sure who she can trust.

War does that to communities. It isolates. It devastates. It fosters fear.

It’s not just the fighting and destruction. It’s the lack of food and water. When there is not enough to go around, everyone does whatever they can to feed their own children. It’s a natural response as a parent.

Imagine how you would feel if your children were starving and you had nothing to give them. Just like Fatimah, you would search every day for help. You would go outside, even if it wasn’t safe, and you would beg for food and water.

Fatimah and her children have been barely surviving for a long time. She needs someone to help her. Someone she can trust. She needs to know she’s seen and loved.

Fortunately, caring people delivered food to Fatimah’s family. They promised to come back with more, and they did. And they’ve continued to help her.

These trustworthy people were able to deliver food to Fatimah and other needy families because of gifts from people like you. Your gift has restored Fatimah’s hope.

Just $10 provides enough food to feed a starving child for an entire month where Fatimah lives. And now, because of special matching grants, $10 will feed two children for an entire month.

Will you provide the miracle a mother like Fatimah is praying for today? Click here to give.

 

 

 

 

The Best Gift for Peng Is Clean Water

What is the best gift you’ve ever received? A gift that really amazed you and made you so happy you grinned for days?

The best gift Peng ever received is something most of us wouldn’t even consider a gift. It’s something we take for granted because it’s there every day, every time we need it.

Peng’s best gift is clean water.

Peng demonstrates her best gift clean water.
Peng’s filthy water is purified by a water filter that takes out 99% of the contaminants it contains and makes it taste great!

That’s right. Clean water is the gift that changed Peng’s life. And it came in the form of a $39 water filter that gets rid of 99% of contaminants in the water she collects each day.

Let me tell you a bit more about Peng and how important clean water is to her …

Continue reading The Best Gift for Peng Is Clean Water

“It was a nightmare…”

January 12, 2010, is a day Haitians will never forget

“I heard a noise like a storm,” recalls Efanor Nore, World Concern Haiti Country Representative. He was driving with several other people through Haiti’s capital city Port-au-Prince when the magnitude 7.0 earthquake hit on January 12, 2010. The road buckled in front of him and another car smashed into the broken concrete.

Buckled Concrete - Efanor's photo
A road that buckled during the 2010 Haiti earthquake. Photo taken by Efanor Nore, just hours after the earthquake struck Port-au-Prince.
Picture taken 45 minutes about before the earthquake
World Concern Haiti Country Representative Efanor Nore snapped this photo of a building in Port-au-Prince just minutes before the earthquake struck on Jan. 12, 2010. The building completely collapsed, killing hundreds inside.

He’d snapped a photo of a large white building in the city just minutes before the earthquake, not knowing it might be the last photo of the building standing.

“This building totally collapsed after,” he said, “We couldn’t even imagine how many people died in there.”

Efanor spent the next 17 hours trying to get to his family’s home in Petit Goave, just south of the city, but the roads were blocked and he had to sleep in his car. Not knowing if his family had survived, Efanor spent the night praying. “I talked to God in my heart and said, ‘Give me strength … If I am still alive, I will serve the Lord,” he prayed.

“I saw many people—women, girls, boys, and men—coming out into the street and seeking a place to rest.  They were covered with dust from concrete. When they saw our car, they asked us to take them to the hospital. I felt really powerless, then I cried,” he remembers.

“When I arrived at Leogane, where the epicenter was located … a woman lay down on the ground in the middle of the street, screaming and weeping. All the communication was cut around 2 to 3 minutes later.

“It was a nightmare.”

Earthquake damage
Buildings and homes crumbled in the 2010 Haiti earthquake, killing an estimated 300,000 people.

Port-au-Prince was in ruins. Cinder block buildings crumbled into dust. While there is no official death toll, the Haitian government estimates more than 300,000 people died in the earthquake.

World Concern’s Response

No World Concern staff were lost or injured in the quake, and the Port-au-Prince office sustained minimal damage. Sleeping in tents on the rooftop for fear of aftershocks, the staff went to work immediately, distributing emergency supplies—bottled water, food, and tarps—to families in need. Over the following weeks and months, World Concern implemented a large-scale response that assisted tens of thousands of people who were affected by the disaster. A massive outpouring of generosity from donors helped meet immediate needs for shelter, water, medical care, and income, as well as plan a long-term response. It was evident it would take years to rebuild Haiti.

Staff
World Concern staff assess damage and assist survivors in the days following the devastating earthquake that shook Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on January 12, 2010.
Supplies are distributed.
A woman receives bottled water and emergency supplies from World Concern just days after the devastating earthquake.

In the months after the quake, transitional shelters were provided to families who lost their homes, and cash grants were given to families and business owners to restart businesses that were lost, among other activities.

Since 2010, World Concern has helped numerous communities prepare for disasters in Haiti, equipping families and communities to be more resilient in the face of recurring disasters, particularly hurricanes and storms. The goal is to bring the government’s disaster plans that are in place down to individual families, where training and equipping are needed most.

“Community members have to own the process,” explains World Concern Deputy Director of Disaster Response, Maggie Konstanski. “At World Concern, we don’t see disaster as a one-time event, but always aim to leave a community more resilient and protected than before.

“When communities are truly equipped with early warning systems, trained on how to use them, and they’re owned at the community level, and an effective, safe plan is in place, it does save lives,” she says. “The community wants to protect and save themselves. We’re giving them the knowledge and tools to protect themselves.”

Is there hope to rebuild Haiti?

Despite efforts from the Haitian community, aid organizations, and the government, the unique and extensive challenges in Haiti have prolonged and even crippled rebuilding efforts. Efanor believes only about 3% of buildings in Port-au-Prince have been rebuilt in 10 years. And an estimated 38,000 people still live in tents and makeshift camps that were set up after the quake.

Corruption, gang violence, political crisis, and drugs have left the city in a state of ruin he believes is even worse than 2010.

“Gangsters occupy many places downtown. Many areas are very high risk and not accessible. Even after the earthquake people were able to operate. Now … it’s not safe at all. Most people have fled downtown– no one would want to live there. All the businesses have moved out,” he said.

Damaged Presidential Palace
This photo, taken in 2010, shows how badly Haiti’s Presidential Palace was damaged in the earthquake. Plans will soon be unveiled to rebuild the palace.

But as this Sunday’s 10th anniversary of the earthquake approaches, Haiti’s president plans to unveil plans on Friday to rebuild the presidential palace that was destroyed in the earthquake. The lot where the palace once stood has remained vacant since about 2012 when the damaged building was finally demolished.

“(The design) takes into account the history and culture of Haiti,” said Efanor, who believes, “It will be a wonderful building that will remind us of the capital city of Haiti.”

Is there hope for Haiti? Efanor believes so.

“Haiti is really resilient. Even at this time of political crisis … Haitians still have hope,” he said. “They think a new day will come where people around the world will use the example of what Haiti has faced over the past 100 years of suffering to learn … The time of Haiti will come,” he said. “We continue to be an example—positively. We face more than any civilization has faced in the past. We hope to use our past experience to move forward.

“Haitians want peace. And we want solidarity. And Haitians love God. We want people to keep loving God in spite of problems, disasters, in spite of poverty, we thank God – the creator of the universe, who has a plan for the world.”

Efanor at church building
World Concern Haiti Country Representative Efanor Nore is shown in 2010 sitting near a church that was destroyed in the earthquake.

Extreme weather brings chronic crises for families in East Africa

Places like Kenya and Somalia have been devastated by extreme weather in the past few years. Not only do families live in ongoing drought, but more recently, flooding has decimated the sparse conditions that remained in Somalia.

Continue reading Extreme weather brings chronic crises for families in East Africa

Snapshots of 2019

World Concern snapshots of 2019 could fill a book. You gave so much, and we are so thankful for you! Enjoy these photos that show a few of the many ways you transformed the lives of children, women, and men who live in poverty beyond the end of the road.

You gave emergency nutrition to 28,901 malnourished children

Emergency nutrition screening in Northern Kenya.
Your gift provided emergency nutrition to babies like this little boy.

You protected 82,157 children and teens from trafficking and child marriage

girl in shadows
May (name changed for protection) was kidnapped from her village at age 14 and trafficked. Your gift helped rescue her and bring her home again.

You empowered parents to feed their children and earn more income

a woman with plants
You gave seeds to women in South Sudan, and their harvest is overflowing!
woman frying fish in South Sudan
Your gifts launched a fisheries training project in South Sudan that provided families with a sustainable food supply and ways to earn an income.

You empowered women through savings groups and business training

a group of women learning about business
Your gift provided business training and an opportunities to save money for women in Nepal.

You enabled children in remote villages to attend school

children in school
Children have books and supplies for school because you gave.

You added 22 One Village Transformed communities and helped 8 villages graduate from our program

Maramara
The village of Maramara and many other communities are thriving because of you!

You helped young Rohingya refugees prepare for a bright future

girls sewing
Young women are learning skills in tailoring, a marketable skill!

Your gifts resulted in 8,717 lives being reconciled to Christ

people reading a Bible
You brought Bibles to men and women who have never read the Word of God before!

Honoring our friend and country director of Bangladesh

Prodip Dowa
After 25 years of service in the country of Bangladesh, our beloved country director Prodip went home to be with the Lord this fall. We miss him greatly.

We want to thank you for giving generously this year! Because of you, practical needs were met for families, and that was life changing. Meeting those needs opened the hearts of men, women and children to hear about the love of Christ and receive His grace. That transformed everything for them—both now, and for eternity.

Last Minute Holiday Gift Ideas

Need some last minute holiday gift ideas?

You know the drill. Your shopping is done for the holidays. You’ve got wrapping well in hand. Your list is nearly crossed off. You’re sitting down for a well-deserved cup of coffee flavored with self-congratulations on your organizational skills.

And then you remember … Uncle Fred.

Continue reading Last Minute Holiday Gift Ideas

When You Give a Kid a Goat

When you give a kid living in poverty in a remote village a goat … It can end up changing their entire life.

Right now you’re thinking “Really? Come on. It’s just a goat.”

Yes. It is “just a goat.” But a goat means a lot more to a child in a poor family beyond the end of the road than it does to someone else.

Want to hear more? Continue reading When You Give a Kid a Goat