Snapshots of 2019

World Concern snapshots of 2019 could fill a book. You gave so much, and we are so thankful for you! Enjoy these photos that show a few of the many ways you transformed the lives of children, women, and men who live in poverty beyond the end of the road.

You gave emergency nutrition to 28,901 malnourished children

Emergency nutrition screening in Northern Kenya.
Your gift provided emergency nutrition to babies like this little boy.

You protected 82,157 children and teens from trafficking and child marriage

girl in shadows
May (name changed for protection) was kidnapped from her village at age 14 and trafficked. Your gift helped rescue her and bring her home again.

You empowered parents to feed their children and earn more income

a woman with plants
You gave seeds to women in South Sudan, and their harvest is overflowing!
woman frying fish in South Sudan
Your gifts launched a fisheries training project in South Sudan that provided families with a sustainable food supply and ways to earn an income.

You empowered women through savings groups and business training

a group of women learning about business
Your gift provided business training and an opportunities to save money for women in Nepal.

You enabled children in remote villages to attend school

children in school
Children have books and supplies for school because you gave.

You added 22 One Village Transformed communities and helped 8 villages graduate from our program

Maramara
The village of Maramara and many other communities are thriving because of you!

You helped young Rohingya refugees prepare for a bright future

girls sewing
Young women are learning skills in tailoring, a marketable skill!

Your gifts resulted in 8,717 lives being reconciled to Christ

people reading a Bible
You brought Bibles to men and women who have never read the Word of God before!

Honoring our friend and country director of Bangladesh

Prodip Dowa
After 25 years of service in the country of Bangladesh, our beloved country director Prodip went home to be with the Lord this fall. We miss him greatly.

We want to thank you for giving generously this year! Because of you, practical needs were met for families, and that was life changing. Meeting those needs opened the hearts of men, women and children to hear about the love of Christ and receive His grace. That transformed everything for them—both now, and for eternity.

When You Give a Kid a Goat

When you give a kid living in poverty in a remote village a goat … It can end up changing their entire life.

Right now you’re thinking “Really? Come on. It’s just a goat.”

Yes. It is “just a goat.” But a goat means a lot more to a child in a poor family beyond the end of the road than it does to someone else.

Want to hear more? Continue reading When You Give a Kid a Goat

Emergency Nutrition Saves Children in Northern Kenya

Emergency nutrition is saving the lives of children who eat only once a day in parts of Northern Kenya.

Their mothers eat even less. They give everything they have to feed their children. Continue reading Emergency Nutrition Saves Children in Northern Kenya

Nobody Thought He Could Learn, But Look At Him Now!

Shiphon with his mother who dreamed he could have an education in Bangladesh.
Shiphon (right) lives with his parents in Hindu Para Village.

Seven-year-old Shiphon is growing up in Hindu Para, Bangladesh. He lives with his parents and sister. His father is a rickshaw driver, and there is no extra money to pay for Shiphon to have an education in Bangladesh where admission to school is often two months wages.

But, in reality, Shiphon’s family never planned for him to go to school anyway. You see, Shiphon is mute. He’s never talked, and no one is sure if he ever will. And special education in Bangladesh is far away from his community.

When Hindu Para Village began to collaborate with World Concern in our One Village Transformed program, we helped them open a preschool in the village. Soon Shiphon’s sister began to attend.

Shiphon saw his sister learning and making friends, and soon he started following her to school. He sat amongst the students and listened eagerly to the teacher. Soon enough, Shiphon was there every day, ready to work.

Shiphon and his teacher who is dedicated to giving children an education in Bangladesh.
Shiphon and his teacher.

“At the beginning, he struggled,” explained Shipon’s teacher. “But now, he has opened up and in some cases is even doing better than the other students.”

Though Shiphon is mute, he manages to write everything down to communicate. He doesn’t speak, but he never fails to express himself.

“Shiphon is the first one to arrive to school,” Shiphon’s teacher shared about him. “I love and admire him because of his dedication to his studies. This determination is his strength, and it overcomes his weakness.”

His determination is also making an impact at home. Shiphon’s mother, Runa, has always dreamed of educating her son, and now it is a reality.

“I would try heart and soul to prepare Shiphon to further his education,” Yeasmin said. “This preschool stands out from other preschools and always supports him.”

For the first time in years, Runa sees a new future for her son.

“I am very grateful to you,” Runa said to World Concern OVT donors. “You value education, and I thank you for supporting Shiphon in his schooling.”

And there’s more good news

Runa also joined one of the savings groups OVT brought to Hindu Para. She started saving money, and her goal is to send Shiphon and his sister to school as they get older. In short, she’s working toward transforming their futures for good!

Shiphon and his sister are just two of over 200 students enrolled in the OVT preschools in this area of Bangladesh.

And the savings group his mother joined? There are 20 others just like it, with members who are learning, growing, and saving to create new opportunities for themselves and their families.

Written by Heather Nelson.

Walking with Lolmodooni

Heather Nelson is World Concern’s One Village Transformed Communications Coordinator. She visited the Samburu region of Kenya in April, and shares her journey to collect water with a Samburu woman named Lolmodooni. 

I walk to get water every day. From the living room to the kitchen. From the bedroom to the refrigerator. From the backyard to the little nook in my garage where I keep a case of water bottles. We all walk to get water.

But we don’t all walk like this.

People in countries where there is drought spend hours walking for a drink of water. Lolmodooni is one of these people.

One morning, she let me come along.

Continue reading Walking with Lolmodooni

Can I Ever Go Home? A True Story of Child Trafficking

Cho’s family was desperately poor and in debt. All of the families in his village in Myanmar struggled to have enough food to eat. So Cho (whose name has been changed) and his friends made a plan. They heard stories about jobs that were easy and paid a lot of money in China. As young teenagers it was illegal for them to work in China, but they knew a man who said he could find work for them.

Continue reading Can I Ever Go Home? A True Story of Child Trafficking

Finding Hope in Lolkuniani – One Village Transformed

It’s dry in Lolkuniani.

So dry that moms and their children walk up to six hours a day to find water. The riverbeds are bare and dusty, but if they dig deep enough small pools of water gradually appear. It’s this water, brown and murky, they scoop into containers that are so heavy when filled they must use a strap against their foreheads to carry the weight.

It’s a physical burden that represents not only the hardships they face, but the weight of understanding that this is not what it means to live a full, abundant life.

Lolkuniani is ready for a change. Continue reading Finding Hope in Lolkuniani – One Village Transformed

A Light in the Darkest Place – Asha’s Story

This story is representative of what families are facing each day in dangerous conflict zones. As you read Asha’s story, put yourself in her shoes. What would you do without food for your children when even stepping outside puts yourself and your child in danger?

Continue reading A Light in the Darkest Place – Asha’s Story