Japan Earthquake Highlights Disaster Risk Reduction

earthquake damage in Japan 2011
Houses, cars and buildings were washed away in a tsunami triggered by a magnitude 8.9 earthquake in Japan on March 11, 2011. Photo by REUTERS/KYODO, courtesy of Alertnet.

The dramatic events unfolding in Japan after a magnitude 8.9 earthquake off Japan’s east coast triggered a devastating tsunami are riveting. They also highlight the difference between communities that participate in disaster risk reduction activities (like Japan) and those that have not been prepared (such as Haiti).

No amount of preparation can stop an earthquake or tsunami, but the next few days will show how preparation and risk reduction have saved countless lives, and minimized the long term effects for the Japanese people. In other nations, this tragic event would have had much greater consequences.

We participate in risk reduction on a daily basis: when the radio identifies a forecast of rain, you assess the risk, and choose to reduce it by carrying an umbrella. On a national scale, this is much more complicated. It requires awareness, planning, and willingness to put plans in place. Today, a few low-lying communities in Washington State were evacuated due to the warnings issued by the West Coast and Alaska Warning Center, a part of the US early-warning system.

The effects of this earthquake in Japan are drastically different than the one measuring 7.0 which paralyzed Port-au-Prince on January 12, 2010. In Haiti, low-quality construction practices, lack of awareness about the risk of earthquakes, and insufficient government capacity to respond created one of the worst humanitarian disasters in history. The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was also a horrifying tragedy impacting unprepared communities from Indonesia to Somalia.

How World Concern Helps Communities Prepare for Future Disasters

World Concern is currently involved in disaster risk reduction activities in high-risk areas around the world, training local communities to prepare for the next “big one.” With World Concern’s help, communities in Haiti, Sri Lanka, and Myanmar are identifying risks and developing strategies to mitigate losses during disasters. Community members work together to find solutions, and educate others on how to protect themselves during a disaster.

In Haiti, for example, communities dig and maintain storm drains to counteract flooding during hurricanes. Other areas have installed emergency water facilities, in case their regular sources are contaminated by floodwaters.

After Cyclone Nargis, which killed more than 130,000 in Myanmar, World Concern supported the establishment of Disaster Management Committees in affected communities, equipping them with disaster response supplies. World Concern also assisted in developing an early warning system, coordinating with the local government, and an implementation of multi-hazard action plans.

World Concern partners and donors are empowering the poorest in high-risk areas to make informed decisions and be proactive in protecting their loved ones and way of life.

Help us respond to disasters and prepare impoverished communities for future disasters by donating at  www.worldconcern.org/disasters

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Chris

Chris Sheach is World Concern's Deputy Director of Disaster Response.

4 thoughts on “Japan Earthquake Highlights Disaster Risk Reduction”

  1. Hello,
    I am pastor of Japanese Ministries at Rock of Ages Lutheran Brethren Church 316 N. 70th Ave, Seattle Wa 98103. I live in 732 N. 195th St. Shoreline,WA 98133
    I have lived 37 years in Japan -mostly in northern Honshu, of these, 15years in Iwate Prefecture and four years in Sendai.
    If World Concern actually gets involved directly in the Tohoku Kanto Earthquake Relief
    please let me know . I may be able to help. I speak Japanese fluently and (speak the northern dialect- It sometimes helps when speaking with the elderly))
    I understand it would be volunteer.
    My cell is 206-795-6818 If you need references I can get those as well.
    i am walking distance from Crista..
    Thank you for reading this and any response would be appreciated.

    Roger

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